Archive | Essentia Health

#Essentia Health offers Free Community Seminar and Vein Screenings in Crosslake

FREE COMMUNITY SEMINAR AND VEIN SCREENING IN CROSSLAKE
Feel confident and pain free again

Essentia Health Vein clinic

Painful veins in your legs can be a symptom of serious health problems. Yet many people defer treatment, thinking that varicose veins are merely cosmetic, and they don’t want to appear vain. Others grow accustomed to the swelling and pain because their condition progresses slowly, creating a “new normal.”

Learn more about vein conditions and treatment options from general surgeon Dr. James Dehen and have an initial screening. The complimentary seminar is from 10:30a.m.-12:30p.m. on Thursday, June 29, following SilverSneakers class at the Crosslake Community Center, located at 14126 Daggett Pine Road in Crosslake. Lunch and beverages will be provided.

“Vein conditions are not solely a cosmetic problem,” according to Dr. Dehen, who sees patients at the Essentia Health clinics in Pine River and Brainerd. Swollen or discolored veins can be symptoms of other medical conditions that need to be treated to avoid serious complications, he explains.

“If your legs are swollen, fatigue easy, or have unsightly or painful leg veins, you should talk to your primary care physician or a surgeon experienced with treating veins.”

Venous diseases are caused by poorly functioning valves within veins. This inefficiency causes spider veins – red or blue web-like veins on the skin’s surface. Untreated, they can grow into varicose veins, which appear as bulges on the leg’s surface. The disease can progress to include swelling, pain, clotting, ulceration and skin inflammation.

Space is limited, so please register by calling 218.828.7583 or email jeri.hughes@essentiahealth.org.

0

Summer Grilling Tips: Healthy marinades add flavor to grilled foods

Guest post from Essentia Health

Healthy marinades add flavor to grilled foods

 

By Bonnie Brost, licensed and registered dietitian at Essentia Health.

Healthy marinades

Summer brings out the grills and healthy menu options as we grill lean meats, chicken, fish and vegetables. Marinating can add robust flavors.

Grilling red meats to the point of charring can increase the heterocyclic amines that have been connected to increasing the risk of cancer. But marinating meats first may help decrease this risk, according to the American Cancer Research Institute.

Marinades have three parts: an acidic liquid, oil and seasonings. The acid causes the tissue on the meat’s surface to break down, which allows more moisture to be absorbed and results in a juicier product. Leaving meats in a marinade too long may “chemically cook” them and cause the surface to turn mushy.  Common acids include vinegars, citrus juices, yogurt, buttermilk or wine. A variety of oils can be used. Spices and herbs add a wide variety of flavor.

A general rule is that you need about ½ cup of marinade for each pound of meat or two pounds of vegetables. About one-third of the marinade’s sodium and calories will be absorbed.

Many marinades are high in sodium, or salt. Many bottled marinades have 300 to 600 milligrams of sodium in each tablespoon. Even if only one-third is absorbed, that’s 100 to 200 milligrams of sodium.

Healthy Marinades

So, make your own marinades with fresh ingredients or choose those with less sodium. For example, Mrs. Dash marinades or World Harbors marinades have zero to no more than 120 milligrams of sodium per tablespoon.

Marinating time depends on the type, cut and size of the meat. Thinner cuts require less time. For example, steaks or chops need two to four hours while a whole roast needs four to six hours. Fish and vegetables require very little time, around 15-30 minutes. Meat that is still frozen will not absorb a marinade, so be sure to thaw first. If using a bottled marinade that is high in sodium, marinating for a shorter time helps avoid “mushy meat.”

Here are some healthy marinades to get your summer off to a great start:

Chipotle Lime Marinade

This marinade is great with lean pork, chicken, fish or vegetables. Makes about ¾ cup.

 

1 chipotle chili pepper in adobo sauce plus 1 teaspoon of the adobe sauce

½ teaspoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon canola oil

½ cup orange juice

3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice

1 tablespoon red-wine vinegar

1 teaspoon dried oregano

⅛ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon fresh ground pepper.

Place all ingredients in a blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Pour mixture into a gallon zip-lock bag or glass container. Use ½ cup per pound of meat or two pounds of vegetables.

 

Nutrition Facts

Servings: 12

Servings size: 1 tablespoon

Calories: 14

Total fat: 1 gram

Saturated fat: 0 grams

Sodium: 35 milligrams

Carbohydrates: 1 gram

Protein: 0 grams

 

Big Bold Marinade

This marinade is wonderful on all kinds of meat and fish as well as firm tofu. I adapted this recipe from eatingwell.com. It makes 1 cup.

2 tablespoons canola oil

¼ cup onion, finely chopped

2 tablespoons minced garlic

3 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce

¼ cup red wine vinegar

½ teaspoon freshly grated orange zest

¼ cup orange juice

2 tablespoons packed brown sugar

2 teaspoons ground allspice

¾ teaspoon fresh ground pepper

½ teaspoon dried thyme

½ teaspoon ground cloves

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

5 dashes of hot sauce

Heat oil in small saucepan. Add onion and garlic; cook about 2 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl. Stir in remaining ingredients. Add up two pounds of protein of your choice.

Nutrition Facts

Servings: 16

Serving size: 1 tablespoon

Calories: 30

Total fat: 2 grams

Saturated fat: 0 grams

Sodium: 90 milligrams

Carbohydrates: 3 grams

Protein: 0 grams

 

Lemon and Garlic Marinade

This is a great marinade for vegetables, fish and lean beef. Makes ¼ cup.

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 tablespoon lemon zest

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 teaspoon Paul Prudhomme’s Magic Salt-Free Seasoning All-Purpose Blend

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Mix all ingredients together in a small bowl. Add meat or vegetables.

 

Nutrition facts

Servings: 4

Serving size: 1 tablespoon

Calories: 35

Total fat: 4 grams

Saturated fat: 2 grams

Sodium: 0 milligrams

Carbohydrates: 1 gram

Protein: 0 grams

 

Marinade safely

Follow these guidelines from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics while marinating to reduce the risk of food-borne illness:

  • Contain it. Marinate food in a container, preferably glass or food grade plastic. Don’t use metal or glazed pottery since the acid in the marinade can interact with it and may add lead. Food grade plastic re-sealable bags are convenient, but must be disposed of after use.
  • Let the refrigerator be your friend.  Make sure the container of marinating food is fully covered. Place it in the refrigerator (below 40 degrees F), not on the kitchen counter.  This will keep food out of the temperature danger zone (40 – 140 degrees) when harmful bacteria can multiple rapidly causing food-borne illness. If traveling, pack marinating meat with ice to maintain temperature.
  • Never reuse marinade. Cross-contamination can lead to food poisoning. This can occur when a marinade is used with raw meat, poultry or fish and then reused “as is” on cooked food. Used marinade needs to boiled to destroy harmful bacteria before using as a sauce, or plan ahead and set aside some fresh marinade to be used as a sauce.

Bonnie Brost is a licensed and registered dietitian at Essentia Health

0

Team approach to Stroke Care makes a difference in treatment and recovery #Essentia

**Shared with permission from Essentia Health press release.

Team approach to Stroke Care makes a difference in treatment and recovery: Learning more about stroke at free community dinner at The Center on June 12th.

Howard Cronquist understood that his wife was asking him if he wanted to head outside to mow the lawn. But he couldn’t answer her, no matter how he tried.

“I knew what I wanted to say, but I couldn’t say it,” the 75-year-old rural Brainerd man recalls.

Essentia Stroke Health

Howard and Sharon Cronquist, of Brainerd, a nearly a year after Howard recovered from a stoke.

Sharon Cronquist found it unusual that her husband wouldn’t reply, despite her repeated questions. She realized he might be having a stroke, even though he didn’t have any other symptoms. She promptly called their son, Darren, who agreed that Howard needed to get to the hospital.

“My son Darren said, ‘We’re going to the hospital’ and I couldn’t argue with him,” Howard remembers of May 19, 2016.

Registered Nurse Deb Blower called a stroke alert just minutes after Howard arrived in the Emergency Department at Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Brainerd. A specially trained stroke team led by Dr. Nathan Laposky quickly assembled to care for Howard and expedite the tests needed to diagnosis a stroke. They also connected via video with Dr. Sheetal Patel, a consulting stroke neurologist at United Hospital in St. Paul.

When CAT scans showed several blood clots in a major artery on the right side of Howard’s brain, the Stroke Code team began treatment with a powerful clot-busting drug called alteplase. Prompt action by the team meant Howard got the drug within 36 minutes of arriving at the hospital. The national benchmark is 60 minutes.

“Time is brain,” Dr. Laposky explains. “The faster we can treat and open a blocked blood vessel, the better the outcome for the patient.”

Dr. Laposky says the partnership with United Hospital brings specially trained stroke neurologists to the patient’s bedside via high-tech video. “The stroke neurologists can recommend treatment based on what they’re seeing and they see strokes every day,” Dr. Laposky says. “They can see the subtle symptoms and know exactly where the problem is in the brain. They’re invaluable.”

Sharon says the team kept her and her son well informed. “I felt Howard was in good hands,” she says. “I trusted them and their judgments.”

Speech and Language Pathologist Kari Johnson visited Howard in the Intensive Care Unit the day after the stroke. “He was so frustrated that he couldn’t communicate,” she recalls. “I told him, ‘I promise this will get better.’ We looked at each other and I knew we were going to work together.”

Since she works in both the hospital and clinic, Kari was Howard’s only speech therapist. “Every day he was gaining ground, doing something he couldn’t do before,” she says. “I’m honored to be able to see him all the way through this therapy. He worked hard and graduated from therapy. He still comes to our monthly support group.”

Howard spent just four days in the hospital and returned home under Sharon’s care. He spent about a month doing speech therapy, physical therapy and occupational therapy. “When I speak now, nobody knows the difference,” he says.

As he recovered, Howard faced challenges like getting dressed or remembering which way a nut screwed on to a bolt. “Sharon put a T-shirt on the bed and I did not know how to put it on,” he remembers. “It took me three days to figure it out and it was a pretty happy day when I did.”

Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Brainerd

Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Medical Center stroke team members surround patients and families with expert care (L to R): stroke coordinator Nicole Anderson, RN, BSN; patient Howard Cronquist; Emergency Department Nathan Laposky, MD; Howard’s wife Sharon; and Intensive Care Unit Gina Kampen, RN, BSN.

Howard was able to return to chores on his cattle farm and work in his shop. At first, he needed to make some adaptations. For a short time, he had problems perceiving distance on his left side so he figured out a way to bale hay using only his right side. He asked his twin brother, Homer, to drive his 1926 Roadster pickup truck for their Thursday morning breakfast club. Later Howard asked a member of the color guard take his place pulling the American Legion float in the Fourth of July parade because Howard didn’t want to risk anyone getting hurt if his reaction time faltered.

The Cronquists say they are grateful that Howard could receive all his care close to home. “We were happy to be here and to stay here,” Sharon says. “That meant a lot.”

Learn more about strokes on June 12.

The Center, in partnership with Essentia Health, is hosting a free dinner and stroke awareness education event on Monday, June 12 beginning at 5pm at The Center, 803 Kingwood Street, Brainerd.

The Minnesota Department of Health identified the Brainerd Lakes Area as a community that has a high rate of people ignoring initial symptoms of a stroke or not getting immediate care by calling 9-1-1. Time is brain when a stroke occurs, so minutes can make a difference in recovery. Essentia Health–St. Joseph’s Medical Center Stroke Program Coordinator Nicole Anderson, RN, BSN, will share the symptoms of a stroke and what should be done to help someone or yourself if they occur.

A delicious dinner will be provided with seating limited to 100 people, so early registration is suggested. For more information about this free event for all generations and to register, call The Center at (218) 829-9345.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE_ Working together for solutions to emergency dental care – rebeccaflansburg@gmail.com – Gmail

**Mom Squad was not compensated for sharing this information.

0

Dental pain ruining your weekend? Essentia Health to partner with area Dentists for pain relief

Essentia Health and Brainerd Lakes Area Dental Offices are Working together for solutions to emergency dental care.

The Emergency Department at Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Medical Center can now offer patients with emergency dental problems more than antibiotics and pain medications. Patients can also get a referral to a local dentist to treat the underlying problem.

Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Medical Center

The Brainerd hospital is partnering with seven local dental offices and the United Way of Crow Wing and Southern Cass Counties in a project called “Help Crow Wing County Smile.”  The community collaboration is aimed at helping patients who lack the ability to pay for dental care or who rely on state or federal medical insurance to get connected to the place the patient can receive the care they need – a dentist office.

“Many people on Medical Assistance can’t get dental care so we become their only resource,” explains Terry Wurtzberger, director of St. Joseph’s Emergency Department. She estimates 25-35 patients visit the department each month due to dental emergencies. Another 10-20 patients go to Urgent Care in the Baxter Clinic.

Dr. Kevin Dens, a Baxter dentist, began researching the problem when he served on the hospital’s board and also on the board of the Minnesota Dental Association, where he now serves as president.

“The emergency department is not equipped to deal with dental problems,” Dr. Dens explains. “They can’t address the underlying problem. By the time people have pain, the decay is so deep into the teeth that it is a major problem.”

Dr. Dens helped recruit six other dental offices to treat patients who come to the Emergency Department and don’t have their own dentist. Those patients are referred to a participating dentist and make their own appointments.

Low reimbursement rates have prompted some dentists to quit accepting patients on government programs, which has reduced access to dental care. That has contributed to the number of people seeking emergency dental care at hospitals, Dr. Dens says.

To help launch the program, the Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Foundation contributed $15,000 to a pilot project in which the United Way partially reimburses the participating dentists for their services when they accept these patients. In addition to Dr. Dens and his son, Dr. Chris Dens, at Cosmetic & Family Dentistry, the participating dental offices are Dr. Paul Perpich, Lakes Country Dental, Design Dental, Edgewood Dental, Lakes Dental Care and Winegar Dental.

Patients that are referred for emergency dental care through “Help Crow Wing County Smile” are asked to given back to the community an hour of volunteer time in exchange for each $25 worth of dental care they receive. The United Way coordinates the giving back part of the program through their online volunteer hub, Get Connected?, at volunteer.unitedwaynow.org.

“We want to offer the best solution for the patient, the hospital and the dentist,” says Dr. Dens. “We want to make a difference and help people cope with dental problems.”

 

“We’re trying to help people connect with the right care at the right time with a dentist,” says Jessica Martensen, the Essentia Health-Baxter Clinic manager who also worked on the project. “We’ve come together with dentists to see how we can help our community.”

 

 

0

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes

UA-21877160-1