parenthood, parenting

Chores Can Help your Child Learn about Teamwork and a Strong Work Ethic

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Summer is on the ways and in a matter of days, my beloved rugrats will be home All.Summer.Long.

As a work at home mom, this can be both a blessing and a hair-puller. But this year we are committing to using a chore chart. Every day, each child (Sara8, Jake-11) will have a list of mandatory things they need to do before any play (usually on electronics) can begin. They also both have specific age-appropriate chores that need to be done over the course of the week.

The purpose of this is not not be Captain Buzz Kill when it comes to their summer fun. Here are some thoughts on why we are being hard-core about the chore chart this year:

Kids and Chores

 

Chores Can Help your Child Learn about Teamwork and a Strong Work Ethic

Chores can help develop a sense of responsibility and self-worth in your child.  It should be understood by all family members they are expected and necessary to a household running successfully and efficiently.  They can help create a sense of unity and family and is a great place for your child to learn about teamwork.  Parents should take special care to handle the delegation of chores to children so they don’t become a source of frustration or create arguments.

Allow your child to have an active say in the delegation of chores.  Give them choices.  We all have household chores that we don’t like to do, but if it’s a chore the child enjoys doing then there’s less likelihood it will create a battle in the end.  The child will most likely appreciate having the chance to be heard and having a choice.

It’s imperative that you set parameters early on for the successful completion of a chore.  They may not perform up to snuff when they first start performing the chore, but show them where improvement is needed and praise them for a strong effort.  Also make sure the child understands there will be repercussions if they only put forth a minimal effort. Ensure the child understands the need for the chore’s effective and efficient completion. Set consequences for substandard completion as a team.  Make sure they see that if they don’t perform their chores, it affects the other members of the team. Spouses must work together and be a strong example for their children by completing their own chores each day.  And don’t allow a child to undermine your authority by battling with you over a designated chore.  Stand your ground and don’t give in, and emphasize the consequence and negative effect an uncompleted chore has on the family.

Here’s a cool online tool I discovered as well. My Job Chart is the free, easy to use, online chore chart and reward system for organizing and motivating your kids to learn first hand how to Save, Share and Spend.

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About Becky Flansburg


Becky Flansburg is freelance writer, blogger and virtual assistant living in Northern Minnesota. A dedicated mom to two beautiful kids, her veteran blog Franticmommy.com is filled with laughter and love about the joys parenthood. Becky is also committed to helping women realize their work-from-home dreams, enjoy life beyond the cubicle and find clarity in the work/life/family balance. Connect with Becky via her website, Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest

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